Other publications

In this section we list publications and materials that don't fit any of the other publication categories. They include publications written by GRAIN for others, and the results of collaborative research and writing projects with partners.

The solution to climate change is in our lands

A global effort to give small farmers and indigenous communities control over lands is the best hope we have to deal with climate change and feed the world’s growing population.

A global effort to give small farmers and indigenous communities control over lands is the best hope we have to deal with climate change and feed the world’s growing population.

Telling family farming fairy tales

In the last 50 years, a staggering 140 million hectares – the size of almost all the farmland in India – has been taken over by four industrial crops: soya bean, oil palm, rapeseed and sugar cane. And this trend is accelerating.

In the last 50 years, a staggering 140 million hectares – the size of almost all the farmland in India – has been taken over by four industrial crops: soya bean, oil palm, rapeseed and sugar cane. And this trend is accelerating.

Land grabber's paradise: Cameroonian environmentalist faces trial

GRAIN, the Oakland Institute and the World Rainforest Movement call on Herakles and the Cameroonian government to drop all charges against Nasako Besingi and his fellow activists and instead engage in good faith with local communities seeking to defend their lands.

GRAIN, the Oakland Institute and the World Rainforest Movement call on Herakles and the Cameroonian government to drop all charges against Nasako Besingi and his fellow activists and instead engage in good faith with local communities seeking to defend their lands.

No agrobiodiversity without peasants

Governments and intergovernmental agreements on agrobiodiversity do not improve farmer and indigenous rights, the team of GRAIN argues. The peasants who are keeping agrobiodiversity alive are under threat from the rapid expansion of industrial farming. We need to fight for food sovereignty to preserve local agrobiodiversity. A short opinion piece by GRAIN in Farming Matters Magazine.

Governments and intergovernmental agreements on agrobiodiversity do not improve farmer and indigenous rights, the team of GRAIN argues. The peasants who are keeping agrobiodiversity alive are under threat from the rapid expansion of industrial farming. We need to fight for food sovereignty to preserve local agrobiodiversity. A short opinion piece by GRAIN in Farming Matters Magazine.

Ejolt report 10: The many faces of land grabbing. Cases from Africa and Latin America.

This report, published by Ejolt, describes and analyzes specific cases of land grabbing around the world as well as successful cases of resistance and the different types of alliances that can be made to fight land grabbing.

This report, published by Ejolt, describes and analyzes specific cases of land grabbing around the world as well as successful cases of resistance and the different types of alliances that can be made to fight land grabbing.

Karuturi, the iconic landgrabber, flops

Karuturi Ltd, the Kenyan flower production unit of Karuturi Global, is in financial collapse and been put under receivership. One of the world's most infamous landgrabbers is in its deepest trouble yet.

Karuturi Ltd, the Kenyan flower production unit of Karuturi Global, is in financial collapse and been put under receivership. One of the world's most infamous landgrabbers is in its deepest trouble yet.

Sierra Leone farmers reject land grab for oil palm plantation

In December 2013, police in Sierra Leone's Pujehun District opened fire on villagers gathered to express their grievances over the lease of 6,500 hectares of land to the Socfin Agricultural Company. It was only the latest incident in a deteriorating situation in Pujehun.

In December 2013, police in Sierra Leone's Pujehun District opened fire on villagers gathered to express their grievances over the lease of 6,500 hectares of land to the Socfin Agricultural Company. It was only the latest incident in a deteriorating situation in Pujehun.

Stolen land: Nigerian villagers want their land back from Wilmar

Wilmar, the world's largest palm oil processor, is building a massive plantation on forest lands illegally gifted to Nigeria's former president, Olusegun Obasanjo. The local community wants these lands back.

Wilmar, the world's largest palm oil processor, is building a massive plantation on forest lands illegally gifted to Nigeria's former president, Olusegun Obasanjo. The local community wants these lands back.

GRAIN in 2012: highlights of our activities

Corporations, power and the global system; people's control over seeds; land grabbing; and agriculture and the climate crisis – these are the interconnected themes of GRAIN's work. In partnership with allies across the world, we document the ways in which the industrial food system damages lives, livelihoods and ecologies, and support the fight for alternatives. 'GRAIN in 2012' highlights some of the activities and achievements that we have been involved in during the year.

Corporations, power and the global system; people's control over seeds; land grabbing; and agriculture and the climate crisis – these are the interconnected themes of GRAIN's work. In partnership with allies across the world, we document the ways in which the industrial food system damages lives, livelihoods and ecologies, and support the fight for alternatives. 'GRAIN in 2012' highlights some of the activities and achievements that we have been involved in during the year.

The Calabar Declaration

We, members of communities affected by industrial monoculture oil palm plantations, including peasant movements, reaffirm our support for all communities repressed by the policies of the powerful and to those who defend their land rights as indigenous peoples and peasant communities; we reaffirm our commitment to demand that the governments of our countries ratify and respect the declarations and relevant international laws that protect the rights of communities and indigenous peoples.

We, members of communities affected by industrial monoculture oil palm plantations, including peasant movements, reaffirm our support for all communities repressed by the policies of the powerful and to those who defend their land rights as indigenous peoples and peasant communities; we reaffirm our commitment to demand that the governments of our countries ratify and respect the declarations and relevant international laws that protect the rights of communities and indigenous peoples.

Yvapuruvu Declaration: seed laws – resisting dispossession

Seeds are the work of peoples and a part of their history. They have been created through collective work, creativity, experimentation, and stewardship. Seeds in turn have shaped peoples, making possible their specific and diverse ways of growing crops and feeding themselves, and allowing them to share and develop their world views. Seeds are therefore intimately linked to community standards, responsibilities, obligations, and rights. Seeds place responsibilities on us that precede our right to use them.

Seeds are the work of peoples and a part of their history. They have been created through collective work, creativity, experimentation, and stewardship. Seeds in turn have shaped peoples, making possible their specific and diverse ways of growing crops and feeding themselves, and allowing them to share and develop their world views. Seeds are therefore intimately linked to community standards, responsibilities, obligations, and rights. Seeds place responsibilities on us that precede our right to use them.

GMOs: Fooling – er, "feeding" – the world for 20 years

Myths and outright lies about the alleged benefits of genetically engineered crops (GE crops or GMOs) persist only because the multinationals that profit from them have put so much effort into spreading them around. They want you to believe that GMOs will feed the world; that they are more productive; that they will eliminate the use of agrichemicals; that they can coexist with other crops, and that they are perfectly safe for humans and the environment. False in every case.

Myths and outright lies about the alleged benefits of genetically engineered crops (GE crops or GMOs) persist only because the multinationals that profit from them have put so much effort into spreading them around. They want you to believe that GMOs will feed the world; that they are more productive; that they will eliminate the use of agrichemicals; that they can coexist with other crops, and that they are perfectly safe for humans and the environment. False in every case.