Other publications

In this section we list publications and materials that don't fit any of the other publication categories. They include publications written by GRAIN for others, and the results of collaborative research and writing projects with partners.

 

Ethiopia: World Bank translator, activists face trial

Human Rights Watch, Bread for All, GRAIN, Anywaa Survival Organisation, Oakland Institute and Inclusive Development International | 22 September 2015 | Other publications

Ethiopian authorities should immediately drop all charges and release a former World Bank translator and two other local activists charged under Ethiopia’s repressive anti-terrorism law after trying to attend a workshop on food security in Nairobi, six international development and human rights groups said today.

[Read the full article]

Plantations are not forests!

Social organisations from Latin America, Africa and Asia | 21 September 2015 | Other publications

Declaration by social organisations from several countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia on 21 September 2015 – International Day of Struggle against Tree Monocultures

[Read the full article]

Corporations; people's control over seeds; land grabbing; and agriculture and the climate crisis – these are the interconnected themes of GRAIN's work. In partnership with allies across the world, we document the ways in which the industrial food system damages lives, livelihoods and ecologies, and support the fight for alternatives.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

More than half a million people living in communities along the banks of the Lúrio River in northern Mozambique will be severely affected if the country's Council of Ministers approves the Lúrio River Valley Development Project (DVRL) in the controversial Nacala Corridor.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Seeds are under attack everywhere. Under corporate pressure, laws in many countries increasingly put limitations on what farmers can do with their seeds and with the seeds they buy. Seed saving, a thousand-year-old practice which forms the basis of farming, is fast becoming criminalised.

What can we do about this?

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Seeds are under attack everywhere. Under corporate pressure, laws in many countries increasingly put limitations on what farmers can do with their seeds and with the seeds they buy. Seed saving, a thousand-year-old practice which forms the basis of farming, is fast becoming criminalised. What can we do about this?

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Seeds are the basis of productive, social and cultural processes that give rural people the ability to maintain a degree of autonomy and to refuse to be completely controlled by big business and big money. For the corporate interests that are striving to take control of land, farming, food and the huge market that these represent, this independence is an obstacle.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Peasant seeds – the pillar of food production – are under attack everywhere. Under corporate pressure, laws in many countries increasingly limit what farmers can do with their seeds. These additional country experiences further illustrate the attacks on seeds – and popular resistance – around the world as described in the booklet, "Seed laws that criminalise farmers: resistance and fightback".

[Read the full article]

With inexpensive Vitamin A abundantly available from various natural sources, it is a mistake to turn blindly to Golden Rice, a crop that the International Rice Research Institute itself admits it has not yet determined can actually improve vitamin A intake. Farmers and civil society organisations strongly denounce the Golden Rice Campaign Tour planned for the Philippines, Bangladesh, and India from 4-20  March 2015 and continue to call for the defence of traditional and farmer-bred crop varieties and the prohibition of the commercialisation of Golden Rice.

[Read the full article]

Seeds are under attack everywhere. This map and database provide a picture of of laws that are limiting farmers' rights to their seeds.

[Read the full article]