Agroecology: Voices from social movements

Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience | 04 October 2015 | technologies, seeds & biodiversity, laws & policies

This video explores the different perspectives of food providers on agroecology and the calls from social movements to embed agroecoogy in the struggle for food sovereignty. It focuses on the International Declaration for Food Sovereignty which has been advanced by social movements to claim agroecology as a bottom up practice, science and movement and the most important pathway towards a most just, sustainable and viable food and agriculture system.

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A short movie about climate change and trade agreements by the Norway Social Forum

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Activists in both China and the United States have raised concerns about just two corporations having so much influence over the world food supply, with so little transparency. But these fears miss the larger point of what such companies represent: the intent of the U.S. government to use food as an ever-more powerful point of leverage to wield over large, increasingly hungry nations like China.

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Civil war in Syria is the result of the desertification of the ecologically fragile Syrian steppe, writes Gianluca Serra - a process that began in 1958 when the former Bedouin commons were opened up to unrestricted grazing.

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Rural women are the guardians of seed, life and love. Without land, seeds cannot be planted. Without land, life cannot be brought forth and without land in the hands of women, the love for nature does not exist while corporate control rapidly destroys the planet we share.

We will not wait to be given land and will march across the world in unity with our sisters.

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A report on landgrabbing by GRAIN and the Mozambique small farmers movement UNAC has sparked quite some debate in the country. According to Chris Arsenault of Reuters: "Mozambique, a country wracked by hunger, has signed away land concessions three times larger than Greater London to outside investors in the past decade, displacing thousands of farmers in the process, said a report released on Thursday".

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Government proposes that those who have worked and lived on a farm for ten years or more should, by law, get a proportional share in the ‘land’ or ‘equity’ on the farm. Du Toit argues that the draft policy's rationale lies not insupposed benefits for those who work the land, but in the political theatre currently unfolding in South Africa as a whole.

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A street vendor in India would need to work for a staggering 350 million years to amass the same amount of wealth as the supermarket's owners, the Walton family – this is just one of the findings of new research by UNI Global Union ahead of worldwide protests against the family's role in global inequality today.

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How a national food policy could save millions of American lives

Mark Bittman, Michael Pollan, Ricardo Salvador and Olivier De Schutter | 10 November 2014 | corporations, technologies, climate crisis, laws & policies, food safety | United States

How we produce and consume food has a bigger impact on Americans’ well-being than any other human activity. Yet we have no food policy — no plan or agreed-upon principles — for managing American agriculture or the food system as a whole. That must change. An appeal for a US food policy.

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The future control of food

Geoff Tansey | 08 September 2014 | food crisis, laws & policies

A wide-ranging guide to the key issues of intellectual property and ownership, genetics, biodiversity, and food security. It also discusses civil society responses to relevant changes and developments in these issues, how they affect the direction of research and development, the nature of global negotiation processes and various alternative futures.

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