Other publications

In this section we list publications and materials that don't fit any of the other publication categories. They include publications written by GRAIN for others, and the results of collaborative research and writing projects with partners.

 

The two big global crises that erupted in 2008 – the world food crisis and the broader financial crisis that the food crisis has been part of are together spawning a new and disturbing trend towards buying up land for outsourced food production. For the past two years, investors have been scrambling to take control of farmland in in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

A background article on landgrabbing by GRAIN, published as a chapter in the Monthly Review Press book  'Agriculture and food in crisis'.

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This article was written by GRAIN and the Pesticides Eco-Alternatives Centre (PEAC) in China to raise Chinese farmers' awareness about the broad historical context of industrial agriculture, and how it paved the way for the introduction of modern varieties of crops and agricultural technologies. Also available in Mandarin.

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A new collaborative briefing, written by GRAIN and published by PANAP (Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific), takes a close look at seed laws in the Asia region.

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For decades now, hybrid rice has been promoted across Asia as a silver bullet for hunger. But a new collaborative briefing published by GRAIN and several other organisations in Asia and the Pacific* examines how hybrid rice has consistently failed Asia’s small farmers over the past decade. From Bangladesh to China, from the Philippines to Indonesia, the promised increased yield has been elusive in farmers’ fields, and the expansion of hybrid rice is now being linked to a recent upsurge of outbreaks of planthoppers across Asia. Hybrid rice is not being promoted for agricultural development but for the control over farming that it offers and the profits that it generates for the seed and agro-chemical companies.

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Via Campesina booklet on small farmers and the climate crisis. Contains a chapter by GRAIN

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On December 15th, La Via Campesina and a number of other groups will be leading a day of action in Copenhagen to put agriculture front and centre in the discussions over climate change. Although the official Convention is sure to disappoint, these groups will be carrying a message of hope. What they want the world to know is that, in their on-going struggle for food sovereignty, there is a way out of the climate crisis.

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6 years of the Biological Diversity Act in India

Kalpavriksh and GRAIN | 10 September 2009 | Other publications

An analysis of the implications of the Indian Biodiversity Act and Biodiversity Rules since 2002.

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From 23 to 27 February 2009, members of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety met in Mexico to discuss the issue of “responsibility and compensation for damages” for transgenics. In opposition, the Network in Defence of Maize organised the Forum for the Life of the People of the Maize over the same period. The document that follows is the speech made to this forum by Camila Montecinos. Although her analysis refers specifically to the situation in Mexico, it actually gives insight into the scope of a global strategy aimed at eradicating independent food production, and criminalising the possession, custody and free exchange of native, ancestral seeds – which have been fundamental to the strategy of the peasantry for more than 8,000 years.

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GRAIN sharing for Via Campesina strategy meeting in Dae-gu, South Korea, 1-5 December 2008

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Food safety on the butcher’s block

Christine Ahn and GRAIN | 29 July 2008 | Other publications

The United States is using bilateral trade agreements to arm-twist weaker countries into accepting its food safety standards as a tool to expand the market control of U.S. corporations. South Korea is the latest victim.

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