Other publications

In this section we list publications and materials that don't fit any of the other publication categories. They include publications written by GRAIN for others, and the results of collaborative research and writing projects with partners.

 

GRAIN launches a new data set documenting 416 recent, large-scale land grabs by foreign investors for the production of food crops. The collection of cases cover nearly 35 million hectares of land in 66 countries, providing a stark snapshot of how agribusiness is expanding across the globe and how it is taking food production out of the hands of farmers and local communities.

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India is one of several countries now being hit by what is referred to as a third wave of corporate retail expansion in the global South. Widespread protests led by India's small shopkeepers and retail workers have put a government decision to open up the retail sector to foreign control on hold for now, but corporations like Walmart and Carrefour will not easily give up on such opportunites for growth. The impacts of big retail's growing control over food markets in the South are particularly harsh for peasants, pastoralists and fisherfolk because they are completely shutout of its supply chains.

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Ploughing through the meanders in food speculation

ODG, in collaboraton with Mundobat, Soberania Alimentaria and GRAIN | 24 July 2011 | Other publications

Today every movement in the Chicago, London or Hanover exchanges, where futures contracts for cereals and oilseed grains are negotiated, has an impact on food. Speculation has become one of the main causes of the changes in the price of food. Why is this happening now? How does this work? Who are the winners and who are the losers? This report, written by researchers at the Catalan NGO ODG, and in cooperation with Mundobat, Soberania Alimentaria magazine, and GRAIN, tries to unveil some of the issues. Download the pdf version.

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On 18-20 April 2011, a gathering of some 200 farmland investors, government officials and international civil servants will meet at the World Bank headquarters in Washington DC to discuss how to operationalise "responsible" large-scale land acquisitions. Over in Rome, the Committee on World Food Security, housed at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, is about to start a process of consultation on principles to regulate such deals. Social movements and civil society organisations (CSOs), on the other hand, are mobilising to stop land grabs, and undo the ones already coming into play, as a matter of utmost urgency. Why do the World Bank, UN agencies and a number of highly concerned governments insist on trying to promote these land grab deals as "responsible agricultural investments"?

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The two big global crises that erupted in 2008 – the world food crisis and the broader financial crisis that the food crisis has been part of are together spawning a new and disturbing trend towards buying up land for outsourced food production. For the past two years, investors have been scrambling to take control of farmland in in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

A background article on landgrabbing by GRAIN, published as a chapter in the Monthly Review Press book  'Agriculture and food in crisis'.

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This article was written by GRAIN and the Pesticides Eco-Alternatives Centre (PEAC) in China to raise Chinese farmers' awareness about the broad historical context of industrial agriculture, and how it paved the way for the introduction of modern varieties of crops and agricultural technologies. Also available in Mandarin.

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A new collaborative briefing, written by GRAIN and published by PANAP (Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific), takes a close look at seed laws in the Asia region.

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For decades now, hybrid rice has been promoted across Asia as a silver bullet for hunger. But a new collaborative briefing published by GRAIN and several other organisations in Asia and the Pacific* examines how hybrid rice has consistently failed Asia’s small farmers over the past decade. From Bangladesh to China, from the Philippines to Indonesia, the promised increased yield has been elusive in farmers’ fields, and the expansion of hybrid rice is now being linked to a recent upsurge of outbreaks of planthoppers across Asia. Hybrid rice is not being promoted for agricultural development but for the control over farming that it offers and the profits that it generates for the seed and agro-chemical companies.

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Via Campesina booklet on small farmers and the climate crisis. Contains a chapter by GRAIN

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On December 15th, La Via Campesina and a number of other groups will be leading a day of action in Copenhagen to put agriculture front and centre in the discussions over climate change. Although the official Convention is sure to disappoint, these groups will be carrying a message of hope. What they want the world to know is that, in their on-going struggle for food sovereignty, there is a way out of the climate crisis.

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