Seedling - October 2010

The October 2010 issue of Seedling features an article by GRAIN on the global expansion of industrial meat production and the rise of a new crop of transnational meat corporations based in countries of the South. In another article, GRAIN looks at what's happening on the climate change front with a special focus on the outcome of the Peoples Summit in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Also in this issue, are two articles by the World Rainforest Movement, one on the push for "carbon shopping in forests" and another on the Roundtable for Responsible Palm Oil's role in expanding monoculture oil palm plantations. Plus, South African researcher Rachel Wynberg takes a critical look back at the experiences of the San peoples of southern Africa with the high-profile case of access-and-benefit sharing concerning the Hoodia plant. And more.....

(download pdf version from document tools)

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Seedling d'octobre 2010 en français

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Wrong road to Cancún

World Rainforest Movement | 13 October 2010 | Seedling - October 2010

Several rounds of talks are under way in the lead-up to the next International Climate Change Conference in Cancún, Mexico at the end of this year. Up to now, these negotiations have focused on guidelines for carbon reporting and assessment that will facilitate “creative” accounting and allow polluting countries to escape obligations to reduce their emissions. At the same time, real proposals for addressing climate change are being ignored.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

People in the South appear to be eating a lot more meat these days. The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) says that per capita meat consumption in developing countries doubled between 1980 and 2005, while the consumption of eggs more than tripled. What happened? According to some, the main factor has been rising incomes in Asia. But the bigger factor is on the supply side. Agribusiness corporations, backed by massive subsidies and government support, have ramped up global industrial meat production to formidable levels over recent decades, with devastating consequences for people, animals and the environment. Much of this is now happening in the South, where a rising group of home-grown transnational corporations (TNCs) is joining ranks with the older firms from the North to push Big Meat into every corner of the planet.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

De nos jours, les pays du Sud consomment apparemment de plus en plus de viande. Selon l’Organisation des Nations unies pour l’agriculture et l’alimentation (FAO), la consommation de viande par habitant dans les pays en développement a doublé entre 1980 et 2005, et la consommation d’œufs y a été multipliée par trois. Comment expliquer cette évolution ? Pour certains, le facteur majeur a été l’augmentation des revenus en Asie, mais cela peut difficilement justifier une hausse aussi énorme. La raison principale est plutôt à chercher du côté de l’approvisionnement. Les entreprises de l’agrobusiness, soutenues pas de fortes subventions et par les gouvernements, ont réussi, au cours des dernières décennies, à pousser la production mondiale de viande à des niveaux inouïs, provoquant des conséquences dévastatrices pour les animaux, les personnes et l’environnement. Une grande partie de cette production industrielle se fait désormais dans les pays du Sud, où une nouvelle génération de compagnies transnationales (TNC), originaires de ces pays, s’allient avec les firmes plus anciennes des pays du Nord, pour imposer “le dieu viande” d’un bout à l’autre de la planète.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

After the debacle of the 2009 climate summit in Copenhagen, the government of Bolivia took an unusual step: it launched a call to “the peoples of the world, social movements and Mother Earth’s defenders” to come together to analyse the causes behind the climate crisis and to articulate what should be done about it. The gathering happened in April 2010 in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and brought together more than 35,000 people from around the world. For once, “the people” – and not the governments – took centre-stage, and their deliberations and conclusions provide a solid basis on which to move forward. If only governments would listen! Here, we focus on the links they draw between climate, food, and agriculture.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Après la débâcle du sommet de Copenhague sur le climat en 2009, le gouvernement bolivien a pris une initiative peu commune : il a appelé « les peuples du monde, les mouvements sociaux et tous les défenseurs de la Terre-Mère » à se rassembler, pour analyser les causes sous-jacentes de la crise climatique et essayer de formuler ce qui doit être fait. Ce rassemblement a eu lieu en avril 2010 à Cochabamba, en Bolivie, et a réuni plus de 35 000 personnes venues du monde entier. Pour une fois, les « peuples » - et non pas les gouvernements - occupaient le centre de la scène et leurs délibérations et leurs conclusions fournissent une base solide qui permet d’aller de l’avant. Si seulement les gouvernements étaient capables d’écouter ! Dans cet article, nous avons choisi de nous concentrer sur les liens mis en évidence à Cochabamba entre le climat, l’alimentation et l’agriculture.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Oil palm plantations have spread rapidly around the globe in recent decades, with profound implications for local communities and the environment. A“Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil” (RSPO) was formed to promote sustainable production practices. But is this possible? Or does the RSPO merely amount to the greenwashing of an inherently destructive industry? The World Rainforest Movement produced an analysis.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Hot air over Hoodia

Rachel Wynberg | 13 October 2010 | Seedling - October 2010

Almost 20 years ago the Convention on Biological Diversity was signed into existence. Now one of its core provisions – the creation of a regime that provides for equitable access to and benefit sharing from biodiversity – appears close to agreement. In October, the Parties to the Convention will meet in Nagoya, Japan, and are expected to agree on a final text. Meanwhile, at the national level, governments have started legislating on this issue. In this article, Rachel Wynberg analyses what this benefit sharing amounts to in the case of the San people of southern Africa, who have seen Hoodia – a plant used locally to stave off hunger – propelled into the centre of commercial interest.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]

Le Hoodia : beaucoup de baratin

Rachel Wynberg | 13 October 2010 | Seedling - October 2010

Il y a près de 20 ans que la Convention sur la diversité biologique (CDB) a été signée. Aujourd’hui il semble qu’un accord sur l’une de ses propositions centrales – la mise en place d’un régime qui réglementerait l’accès et le partage équitables des bénéfices de la biodiversité - soit à portée de main. En octobre, les Parties doivent se rencontrer au Japon et sont censées se mettre d’accord sur un texte final. Entre temps, au niveau national, les gouvernements ont commencé à légiférer sur le sujet. Dans l’article qui suit, Rachel Wynberg analyse en quoi consiste ce partage des bénéfices pour les San, un peuple d’Afrique australe, qui ont vu leur cactus Hoodia prendre soudain une forte valeur commerciale.

[Read the full article] — [Download PDF]