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Bulletin boardThe bulletin board is a place where GRAIN staff and others post their comments, suggestions, hints and assessments of documents, places or events. Or just share information that we think is interesting.

 


 

From 24-27 February, the women and men gathered at the International Agroecology Conference in Mali will debate and share experiences to reinforce a common vision and principles of agroecology that include its social, economic and political elements.

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Tycoon-controlled oil palm groups in Indonesia

Rahmawati Retno Winarni and Jan Willem van Gelder | 20 February 2015 | land grabbing, corporations | Indonesia

The rapid expansion of Indonesian oil palm plantations creates serious environmental and social problems. A report analyse the ownership and financing of 25 large tycoon-controlled business groups that control 31% (3.1 million hectares) of the total planted oil palm plantation at present. These groups still have at least 2 million hectares of undeveloped land banks under control. The most important business groups - in terms of their planted areas - are Sinar Mas Group, Salim Group, Jardine Matheson Group, Wilmar Group and Surya Dumai Group.

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A report on landgrabbing by GRAIN and the Mozambique small farmers movement UNAC has sparked quite some debate in the country. According to Chris Arsenault of Reuters: "Mozambique, a country wracked by hunger, has signed away land concessions three times larger than Greater London to outside investors in the past decade, displacing thousands of farmers in the process, said a report released on Thursday".

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Government proposes that those who have worked and lived on a farm for ten years or more should, by law, get a proportional share in the ‘land’ or ‘equity’ on the farm. Du Toit argues that the draft policy's rationale lies not insupposed benefits for those who work the land, but in the political theatre currently unfolding in South Africa as a whole.

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On Wednesday, February 11 2015, Chai Bunthonglek, a land rights activist from Klong Sai Pattana village, Chaiburi District  Suratthani Province and member of the Southern Peasant Federation of Thailand was gunned down. International and local human rights defenders have condemned the murder of a land rights activist in Surat Thani.



 

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The front lines of the food sovereignty war in Ghana are swelling as the national parliament gives support to the Plant Breeders Bill. This proposed legislation contains rules that would restrict farmers from freely saving, swapping, and breeding seeds.

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Right to land and seed

Jürgen Kraus and Heiko Thiele | 15 December 2014 | food sovereignty, actions

“Food sovereignty” is the main political demand of the landless and peasant movement in Bangladesh in times of climate change and intensifying land conflicts. The peasant movement fights for a revolutionary land reform and self-determined food production, in order to improve and guarantee the local and national food supply.

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There’s little doubt that the use of palm oil is expanding rapidly throughout the world, and with it the need for millions of hectares of land to grow oil palm trees. The results can be devastating for local communities who depend on the agriculture and forests that these lands support, which led the international NGO GRAIN to catalog the issues that arise with oil palm expansion in a report titled “Planet Palm Oil.

 

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A street vendor in India would need to work for a staggering 350 million years to amass the same amount of wealth as the supermarket's owners, the Walton family – this is just one of the findings of new research by UNI Global Union ahead of worldwide protests against the family's role in global inequality today.

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European taxpayer funds save Canadian Congo plantation paying workers $1 a day, as backers say the move creates jobs.

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