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In December a GRAIN/Biothai seminar in Thailand focused on the TRIPS Agreement of the WTO, and more specifically the implications of this agreement for rights over biodiversity and related knowledge. Included in this overview is "The Thammasat Resolution", a common position reached by the participants.

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US trade and agriculture representatives like to present the US as the world's breadbasket, consistently producing ever-increasing amounts of safe and nutritious food for a hungry world. Close examination finds instead, that the endless drive to maximise production is taking its toll, on both US society and the environment.

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As the worldwide fishing crisis continues, the industry is regearing itself to secure a continued supply of luxury fish to lucrative markets. Aquaculture and genetic engineering are being heralded by proponents of the Blue Revolution, as the ideal solution. GRAIN examines the record so far and looks at the future implications.

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1996 was a year of unprecedented international attention for agricultural biodiversity. But was any tangible progress made? GRAIN looks back.

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A wealth of evidence demonstrates that biodiverse farming can compete with industrial agriculture in terms of system-wide productivity and that it offers the important advantages of sustainability and risk reduction. GRAIN examines the case that the formal sector can no longer ignore.

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Growth from obscurity to biggest selling vegeatable in less than a century has made tomato an object of corporate attention. Intensive industrial producion has lead to genetic uniformity of the crop which is largely owned and consumed by the North.

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While bioprospecting agreements continue to be heralded as the way towards conserving biodiversity and sustainable development, this article takes a critical look at some of those agreements, seen by many as legalised biopiracy.

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The Convention on Biodiversity says countries should regulate access to genetic resources. The mechanisms to do this are starting to emerge at the regional, subregional and national levels. A case study of the Philippines' now-famous Executive Order 247 governing bioprospecting.

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Genetically-engineered herbicide-tolerant soybean gained worldwide public attention due to consumer opposition in Europe. As with many other crops, the soybean market is characterised by increasing consolidation of corporate control over it, specially through genetechnology R&D strategies.

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